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The relations between morphological awareness and reading comprehension in beginner readers to young adolescents

Morphological awareness plays a crucial role in supporting higher-level text processing. We examined its contribution to reading comprehension in...
Morphological awareness plays a crucial role in supporting higher-level text processing. We examined its contribution to reading comprehension in children of different ages and ability levels in order to determine when and for whom morphological awareness is of particular...
Morphological awareness plays a crucial role in supporting higher-level text processing. We examined its contribution to reading comprehension in children of different ages and ability levels in order to determine when and for whom morphological awareness is of particular importance. Highlights What is already known about this topic Morphological awareness of inflections and derivations is significantly associated with reading comprehension but partly mediated by vocabulary knowledge.In general, morphological awareness becomes an increasingly important predictor of reading comprehension between 6 and 11 years.Children with poor reading comprehension exhibit weaknesses in morphological awareness. What this paper adds Awareness of morphological compounding, inflections and derivations comprises a single factor in developing readers aged 6 to 13 years.Morphological awareness makes a unique contribution to reading comprehension ability beyond oral vocabulary and word reading skill.The relationship between morphological awareness and comprehension ability is evident and comparable in strength across the age range, and morphological awareness predicts reading comprehension across the ability range. Implications for theory, policy or practice An appreciation of morphology should be taught from the earliest stages of reading instruction to early adolescence.Weak morphological awareness is an indicator of reading comprehension difficulties.Both good and poor comprehenders will benefit from enhanced morphological awareness.
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Intensive Intervention Practice Guide: Applying Response to Intervention for Secondary Students Who Struggle With Reading Comprehension

Response to Intervention (RTI) is a multi-level framework designed to prevent academic failure and remediate areas of deficit. It...
Response to Intervention (RTI) is a multi-level framework designed to prevent academic failure and remediate areas of deficit. It is a framework to support students for whom generally effective practices have been insufficient. Its inclusion in the Individuals with...
Response to Intervention (RTI) is a multi-level framework designed to prevent academic failure and remediate areas of deficit. It is a framework to support students for whom generally effective practices have been insufficient. Its inclusion in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA; U. S. Department of Education, 2004) identified RTI with special education eligibility determination. However, RTI can also be viewed as a framework to organize increasingly intensive instruction for students at risk for or with disabilities (D. Fuchs, Fuchs, & Stecker, 2010). Many secondary students who struggle to read, regardless of disability status, struggle specifically with reading comprehension. These students will need interventions targeting comprehension and other related skills to make progress. The RTI framework consists of four main components: (1) universal screening; (2) levels of increasingly intensive intervention; (3) progress monitoring; and (4) data-based instructional decisions. By the secondary grades, the primary focus of RTI shifts from the identification of to the treatment of difficulties (Vaughn & Fletcher, 2012), suggesting alterations to the traditional RTI framework used in the elementary grades. While there is limited research on the effectiveness of RTI in the secondary grades to remediate reading comprehension difficulties, there is evidence that adolescence is not too late to improve reading comprehension outcomes (Scammacca et al., 2007). Overall, the literature supports the implementation of intensive reading interventions for students in secondary schools and that using an RTI framework to intensify reading comprehension interventions is an effective approach for these students.
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The Role of Background Knowledge in Reading Comprehension: A Critical Review.

A critical review was conducted to determine the influence background knowledge has on the reading comprehension of primary school-aged...
A critical review was conducted to determine the influence background knowledge has on the reading comprehension of primary school-aged children. We identified twenty-three studies that met our criteria and focused on the links between background knowledge and reading comprehension...
A critical review was conducted to determine the influence background knowledge has on the reading comprehension of primary school-aged children. We identified twenty-three studies that met our criteria and focused on the links between background knowledge and reading comprehension of children in the mid to late primary years. Review findings highlight that higher levels of background knowledge have a range of effects that are influenced by the nature of the text, the quality of the situation model required, and the presence of reader misconceptions about the text. Our findings also indicate that background knowledge impacts differentially on stronger and weaker readers. Readers with lower background knowledge appear to benefit more from text with high cohesion, while weaker readers were able to compensate somewhat for their relatively weak reading skills in the context of a high degree of background knowledge. Implications of the findings for early years classroom practice are outlined, together with suggested future research directions.
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Reading comprehension requires knowledge – of words and the world

While educators have made good progress in teaching children to decode (that is, turn print into speech sounds), it...
While educators have made good progress in teaching children to decode (that is, turn print into speech sounds), it is disheartening that we still have not overcome the fourth-grade slump in reading comprehension. We are finding that even though...
While educators have made good progress in teaching children to decode (that is, turn print into speech sounds), it is disheartening that we still have not overcome the fourth-grade slump in reading comprehension. We are finding that even though the vast majority of our youngest readers can manage simple texts, many students - particularly those from low-income families - struggle when it comes time in grade four to tackle more advanced academic texts.
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